Koenigsegg CC8S


Debut: 2002
Maker: Koenigsegg
Predecessor: No



 Published on 4 Jan 2004
All rights reserved. 
The company

Koenigsegg, a small Swedish supercar maker, was founded by Christian von Koenigsegg in 1994. He was very young, just 22 years old then, but he succeeded to raise the required money to develop and polish the supercar in the following 8 years until the first CC8S delivered to client in March 2002. That’s amazing. His biggest success was to get the Swedish public excited (it’s the country’s first supercar) and many Swedish component suppliers involved the project. Even Volvo and Saab gave helping hands to Koenigsegg in the evaluation of aerodynamics and chassis rigidity, all free of charge. Now I know why the company could survive for so long without earning a penny: it is simply a state-owned project !

Since the car went into production, 6 cars were delivered. 25 others are on order book. Koenigsegg follows the footprints of Pagani to be another new supercar maker succeeded to survive, at least for the near future.

The car

In the UK, CC8S is priced at £367,000, this make it more expensive than Porsche Carrera GT, Pagani Zonda and Mercedes SLR, just shine of Ferrari Enzo. This seems expensive for a no-one-know supercar built in Sweden, but Koenigsegg claims very tempting figures: 655 horsepower (that’s level with Enzo), 1275kg (90kg lighter than Enzo), 0-60mph in 3.4 sec (0.15 sec faster) and a McLaren-matching 240mph top speed. Christian von Koenigsegg also talked of possible reaching 400kph (248.5mph). Can you believe that? obviously not before we examine its technical details.

The car was styled by Christian von Koenigsegg himself but its shape is largely dictated by aerodynamics. It is not as striking as Pagani or Enzo. At some angles it even looks bulky, like a big whale. But the whale delivers a sense of power that you can’t find in its rivals either.

Because of the targeted top speed, the body is designed to be so smooth that it has a very low drag coefficient of 0.30. This is much lower than Enzo (0.36), SLR (0.37) and Carrera GT (0.39). Unsurprisingly, the downside is a rather low downforce, just 50kg at the front and 70kg at the back. For comparison, an Enzo generates 775kg while Pagani achieves 500kg.

The chassis is constructed like other supercars. Central to it is a carbon-fiber tub (Koenigsegg called it "semi-monocoque") attached with steel subframe up front and aluminum subframe at the rear for mounting engine, gearbox and suspensions. Chassis rigidity is 28,100Nm per degree despite of the targa roof. The whole bodyshell is also carbon-fiber. Koenigsegg claims a dry weight of 1175kg, which translates to 1275kg when fluid and fuel are loaded, i.e., what we usually refer to "kerb weight". In other words, CC8S is about as light as Pagani and Saleen S7, while being around 100 kilograms lighter than Enzo and Carrera GT.

This level of weight control is outstanding when you consider how well the car is built and equipped. In my recent Mercedes SLR report, I described it "loaded with equipment cannot be dreamed in other supercars". That’s not exactly true, because the Koenigsegg also offers ABS, traction control, air conditioning, climate control, CD changer, mobile phone, sat nav, power windows, power mirrors, central locking etc. The only thing it misses is an automatic transmission.

Open the door is usually a sensational moment for supercars, but this one is even more spectacular: unseen before, these doors operate with 2 axis, simultaneously pivot upward and outward. This might be meaningless to practicality, but it proves that the car is elegantly engineered. Step across the wide sills and drop into the carbon-fiber buckets. The environment is quite strange, because the digital reading is housed in a strange instrument binnacle, the buttons on center console are arranged like a telephone dial and the gear lever is a foot long. While the taste of Koenigsegg is questionable, the build quality is not. This is a well finished interior. Most surfaces are clad with leather and the floor is bare carbon fiber. Space is quite limited for people over 6 feet, but the seats and steering wheel are multi-adjustable, so finding a suitable driving position is easy.

Engine and Performance

Start the engine, it roars like an American V8. Yes, it is an American V8 ! very disappointing, like many cheaper British sports cars and American tuner’s cars, this Swedish supercar is powered by a supercharged version of Ford Mustang’s dohc 32-valve V8. 60% of it has been modified, from the titanium header that lifts capacity to 4.7 litres, the lowered 8.6:1 compression, the intercooled Vortec supercharger which boosts 1.0 bar, the forged pistons and con-rods, the dry-sump aluminum crankcase that allows the engine to be installed lower in the chassis, the weight-saving carbon-fiber intakes.... however, you still feel a modified Ford V8 is never an ideal engine to a supercar. It might work in Ford GT, but not a car costing 4 times the money. For sound, for willingness and response, there is no replacement to a high-tech V12 or V10. Unfortunately, Koenigsegg could neither source a better engine nor develop a one itself.

On paper, this engine delivers 655 horsepower at a high 6800rpm and it redlines at a mighty 7500rpm. The peak torque of 553 lbft arrives at 5000rpm. So, it should have the best combination of power and torque on the market. Unfortunately, that is only on paper. In reality, the high-boost 4.7 V8, with its unusually high specific power, lacks torque at low to medium rev to fight against its rivals. Its torque curve is more like an old-fashion turbocharged engine’s than a supercharged engine’s, putting emphasis on the top end of its spectrum. At 3000rpm, only half the maximum torque is available. In contrast, Mercedes SLR’s supercharged V8 emits its peak 575 lbft at that rev. No wonder Autocar magazine criticized it lack flexibility. It found the CC8S took a laughable 10.2 seconds to accelerate from 50-70mph at top gear while Pagani Zonda C12S needed only 4.4 sec.

Much of the blame must go to the Vortec supercharger. It is a centrifugal-type supercharger, unlike the screw-type supercharger used by other supercars such as Mercedes SLR, SL55AMG and Ford GT. Centrifugal-type superchargers are very much like turbochargers except that their turbines are driven by crank instead of exhaust gas. Their advantage is high power gain, which the Koenigsegg needs to get most from its 4.7-litre capacity. The disadvantage is weak boost when the turbine is not spinning quick enough, just like turbochargers. They also cause some throttle delay, similar to turbo lag, as Evo experienced in the Koenigsegg.

However, peaky power delivery is not all the problem. Autocar also suspected the engine is not as powerful as claimed. Theoretically, it should match or at least come close to McLaren F1 in acceleration, but the data recorded said otherwise: 0-60mph took 4.4 sec, 0-100mph in 8.4 sec, 0-150mph in 17.6 sec and 0-200mph in 35.4 sec. For comparison, McLaren did that in 3.2 sec, 6.3 sec, 12.8 sec and 28.0 sec respectively. This miss the mark by a large margin and falls behind other less powerful rivals.

What about top speed? Judging from the time Autocar needed to get to 200mph, it is unquestionable the car can pass the 210mph mark or maybe even 220mph. But so far Koenigsegg has yet to prove its McLaren-beating speed. It claimed once saw 233mph when testing on a wet Nardo track and the car was still accelerating. However, you know, claim is claim. Before CC8S set a record in front of witness, I won’t believe it could topple McLaren F1.

Handling and Ride

The chassis of Koenigsegg is obviously much more promising than its engine. Weight distribution between front and rear axle is 45:55, this help it to balance remarkably well. It is also fine-tuned by supercar tuning expert Loris Bicocchi, the man responsible for the handling and ride of Bugatti EB110, Edonis and Zonda.

On the road, the CC8S handles very good. Initially it feels too big and wide while understeer a little in tight corners. Give it an open road, it immediately comes alive. Up the pace and the understeer is replaced by neutrality. Massive grip from the wide tires and powerful AP brakes (with superb pedal feel too) give you full confidence, as is the steering wheel which transmits stream of information from the front wheels to your arms. The Italian Cima gearbox also shifts satisfyingly, with short throw, slick and precise action. Bicochhi has the chassis and its human interface sorted so well !

In fact, this chassis is better sorted than Ferrari Enzo’s. Both cars have traction control to prevent from sliding rear wheels, but the Ferrari’s system works busier. In the Koenigsegg, you have to steer aggressively to swing its rear end out. That’s partly due to its weaker torque, partly thanks to its better balance.

It also rides pretty good - not as supple as Zonda, but more forgiving than Enzo. Besides, the aluminum double-wishbones suspensions use electronic adjustable shock absorber to allow ride height adjustment. On bumpy roads, the driver can increase ride height to prevent bottom out.

Verdict

Like other supercars tuned by Loris Bicocchi, Koenigsegg CC8S will be remembered for the way it handles and communicates with its driver. Unfortunately, it got a poor engine and therefore does not deliver the performance it promised and the eagerness its customers expected. Give it an AMG V12 and a more adventurous styling, it could jump to the top of the supercar chart.... but then it will need to be renamed to "Pagani".
Verdict:
 Published on 20 May 2005
All rights reserved. 
CCR
Feb 28, 2005 was an unbelievable day: Koenigsegg CCR broke the 7-year-old top speed record held by McLaren F1. The swedish supercar lapped Fiat's Nardo test track at 241.0 mph (387.9 kph), edging out the McLaren's 240.1 mph which was set in 1998.

If you look at the spec, you won't be surprised. The CCR is even more powerful than the previous CC8S. Its supercharged 4.7-litre V8 is boosted to 806 horsepower from 655 hp, and maximum torque surged from 553 lbft to 678 lbft. That made it the most powerful car in the world until the arrival of Bugatti Veyron. Compare with McLaren F1, it possesses 120 more horsepower and a slightly lower drag coefficient. Breaking record is just a matter of time.

How can it achieve so much more power from the same engine capacity? The answer is a twin-supercharger system. Instead of a single Vortec supercharger, the CCR employs two smaller Rotrex superchargers. They are not only more responsive – an aspect the CC8S is so weak – but also raise maximum boost pressure from 1.0 bar to 1.4 bar. No wonder the CCR can achieve an astonishing specific output of 171 horsepower per litre.

Again, the superchargers are centrifugal type. They are extremely efficient at high rev but relatively weak at low rev. They does not produce maximum boost until 5000 rpm, thus the V8 produces max torque at a rather high 5700 rpm. Slow throttle response, or turbo lag, is another problem. Koenigsegg partially solved this by introducing an innovative boost control unit, whose vacuum-driven extra throttle feeds pressurized air to the engine even before the turbine get working. It also creates a low pressure zone before the turbine, helping it to accelerate more quickly.

Outside, the CCR is distinguished from CC8S by reshaped headlamps and a large air splitter at the nose. The latter helps improving downforce and stabilizing the air under and around the car.

The brakes also got upgrade. Now it employs 362mm diameter discs and 6-piston calipers all round. Elsewhere the CCR remains the same as CC8S. The total weight gain is just 5 kg.

Despite breaking the top speed record, company boss Christian von Koenigsegg believes the CCR has potential to surpass 245.4 mph (395 kph) if it were tested on a straight test track instead of the circular, banked Nardo. In fact, McLaren's 240.1 mph record was set on Volkswagen's straight test track Ehra-Leissen. Previously, it did “only” 231 mph at Nardo.

However, 2 months after the Koenigsegg test, Bugatti Veyron broke the record again at 248.5 mph (400 kph).
Verdict:
 Published on 1 Jul 2008
All rights reserved. 
CCX, CCXR and Edition

We could hardly imagine a supercar which was first debuted in motor show 8 years ago and started production 5 years ago could go stronger and stronger today...

Call it a Scandinavian miracle won't be far from the truth. Koenigsegg has surprised many, including myself, times to times. 5 years ago when I saw the flawed CC8S, I thought this Swedish supercar maker might just close down in a couple of years time due to lack of interest. Yes, Christian von Koenigsegg sold only 6 units of CC8S in the first 2 or 3 years, but he kept investing into the company, hiring talents to improve his cars and establishing partnerships with exotic component suppliers all over the world. When his next car, CCR, broke the long-standing speed record of McLaren F1 in 2005, orders started flowing in. In another 2 years time, Koenigsegg built 20 CCR model to satisfy the world's richest car enthusiasts.

More amazing is how well it resists the test of time. Supercars are usually big toys to millionaires. They get popular in one instant and turn outdated in the next instant. We could hardly imagine a supercar which was first debuted in motor show 8 years ago and started production 5 years ago could go stronger and stronger today. Koenigsegg is just that magical. Thanks to relentless development, every iteration of the Koenigsegg gets faster, better built and more desirable. If there are any keys to its success, they must be the will and long-term vision of Christian von Koenigsegg.



6 CCXR Edition will be built in 2008, each possessing horsepower to beat Bugatti Veyron...

CCX

After CCR, Koenigsegg wanted to expand into the huge USA market. Therefore in 2007 the CCR was superseded by the world-legal CCX. To satisfy Federal impact regulations, its front and rear bumpers were modified and lengthened. To satisfy American customers who ask for more headroom, the bubble roof panel was raised by 50 mm. This resulted in a slightly larger frontal area, while drag coefficient was also increased from 0.30 to 0.32. The 4.7-liter V8 engine got a new block (no longer based on Ford V8) which is lighter yet stronger. Power rating remains unchanged from CCR, i.e. 806 horsepower and 678 lb-ft of torque, but it can drink 91 Octane
fuel now which is common in the US.

According to factory figures, Koenigsegg silently changed the 1280 kg kerb weight to dry weight, which actually represents an increase of 100 kg. Interestingly, despite of a higher drag and more weight, it still claims 245 mph top speed and 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds. Considering the CCR's 241 mph record was done at the banked Nardo, it is still possible for CCX to do 245 mph on an arrow-straight test track. Nevertheless, the 0-60 mph time claimed by Koenigsegg has always been nearly impossible to achieve because it has problems to lay down that huge power on the road, especially without a sophisticated launch control like Ferrari's F1 Trac. That was why Sport Auto magazine managed only a disappointing 3.7 seconds. At higher speed, the Koenigsegg started catching up. By 186 mph (300 km/h) it is already noticeably faster than Ferrari Enzo and trails only Bugatti Veyron (see table below).

 
0-100 km/h
0-200 km/h
0-300 km/h
Test source
Bugatti Veyron (2005)
2.5 sec
7.3 sec
16.8 sec
Bugatti
Koenigsegg CCX (2007)
3.8 sec
9.3 sec
21.9 sec
Sport Auto
McLaren F1 (1993)
3.2 sec
approx. 9.6 sec
approx. 22.4 sec
Autocar
Pagani Zonda Cinque (2008) 3.4 sec
9.6 sec
-
Pagani
Ferrari Enzo (2002) 3.6 sec
10.3 sec
26.1 sec
AMS
Mercedes SLR 722 (2007)
3.8 sec
10.5 sec
29.6 sec
Sport Auto

CCXR

The CCX is still slower than Bugatti Veyron, therefore Koenigsegg also offered a bio-fuel version called CCXR to beat the Bugatti. Drinking E85 fuel - i.e. a mixture of 85% ethanol and 15% petrol - allows higher compression ratio (8.8:1 instead of 8.2:1) and higher supercharger boost pressure (1.6 bar instead of 1.4 bar), thus results in a Bugatti-beating 1018 horsepower ! Remember, this car is a massive 600 kg lighter than the Bugatti, so despite of its traction problem and less low-down torque, it might just match the Bugatti at higher speed.

 

Excellent handling aside, ride is also surprisingly supple...

CCX Edition and CCXR Edition

In 2008, Koenigsegg uprated the cars again. Some 20 Edition models - 14 CCX Edition and 6 CCXR Edition - will be built during the year. They are more track-oriented than the previous cars, with a larger front air splitter, a spectacular "X-wing" rear spoiler (which generates 350 kg downforce at 155 mph), stiffer and lower suspensions. The engines are bored out to 4.8 liters, accompany with higher compression (8.6:1 and 9.2:1) and remapped ECU to produce higher output - the CCX Edition pumps out 82 more horsepower while the bio-fuel CCXR Edition gains slightly more torque. The big rear spoiler increases their drag coefficient to 0.36, so the optimistic top speed claims - 250 mph for CCX Edition and 254 mph for CCXR Edition - are based on cars with rear spoiler removed.

As before, the Koenigsegg supercars are strong at handling. No matter body control, grip, steering feel and accuracy it is always first class. Its ride is also surprisingly supple, thanks to an immensely rigid chassis (some 57,000 Nm per degree !) and lightweight suspensions and wheels. What an engineering masterpiece it is. The fit and finish of its carbon-fiber bodywork is also faultless, especially in the Edition cars that unpainted pure carbon fiber is deliberately made visible under a layer of lacquer. I still have some problems to accept its cabin design - in particular that big round instrument pod and dial-like center console - and the non-linear power delivery of its twin-centrifugal supercharger V8. It will never provide the effortless performance of Bugatti Veyron. However, neither will the Bugatti match its raw fun.

No wonder Koenigsegg dares to ask for even higher prices than the Bugatti. The CCX and CCXR Edition are priced at 1.33 million and 1.5 million Euro respectively excluding tax. All of them have been allocated. What will Koenigsegg do next ? I can't wait.
Verdict:
 Published on 20 Mar 2014 All rights reserved. 
Agera / Agera R


Koenigsegg has been rivalling Bugatti to be the world's fastest car for many years but it is still relatively mysterious. Few motoring journalists had the chance to drive it. Most of them had their driving experience confined in Koenigsegg's proving ground, i.e. a former airforce straight runway. Fewer were given the freedom to drive it on public roads, let alone to have a long trip on challenging roads to find out its true talent. Moreover, no one was allowed to put timing gears on, so until now all the eye-popping performance figures were provided by the factory without evidence. In September 2011, Koenigsegg invited Guiness to witness the record runs of its new Agera R. The car hit 0-186 mph (300 km/h) in 14.53 seconds and 0-200 mph in 17.68 seconds, faster than Bugatti Veyron SS. Despite that, we don't know if the test car was specially prepared or tuned for the attempt, or if Guiness had the expertise to verify it. Until Koenigsegg allows motoring journalists to test the car independently, the debate about "which one is the world's fastest road car" will continue…

Anyway, Agera is no doubt an insanely fast car, even faster than the previous CCX Edition. It is a further evolution from the latter thus its roots could be traced back to the CC8S that debuted some 12 years ago. Many major upgrades have been introduced in this generation so that Koenigsegg claimed it practically a new car. This begins with the carbon-fiber tub chassis, which has its torsional rigidity increased from the previous 57,000 to 65,000 Nm/degree. Note that this is the rigidity of the tub only, not the whole chassis which includes front and rear subframes made of chrome-moly steel. The rear subframe supplements the semi-stressed engine/transmission which is bolted directly to the carbon-fiber tub. To improve ride comfort and roadholding, the Agera introduces a unique rear suspension design called "Triplex". It links the left and right suspensions with an additional spring and shock absorber so that it reacts softer to bumps and harder to squat or vertical load (e.g. down force). The suspension itself remains passive (though ride height is adjustable), but ride quality should be improved by using superlight carbon-fiber wheels (a world's first for road cars). The front and rear wheels weigh 5.9 kg and 6.5 kg respectively, 2 kg and 3.2 kg lighter than the forged alloy wheels of McLaren P1. Needless to say, its brakes are ceramic.



The powertrain is overhauled, too. Koenigsegg’s in-house V8 has its displacement increased from 4.8 to 5.0 liters while the twin-supercharger is replaced with twin-turbo. The engine still lacks direct injection and variable valve timing, but a good knock control and high-precision machining of the combustion chambers enable it to run a pretty high, 9.0:1 compression ratio. Lightweight forged pistons and titanium connecting rods allow the V8 to belie its undersquare design (91.7 mm bore x 95.25 mm stroke) and spin up to 7500 rpm. Meanwhile, the turbos pump up to 1.4 bar of boost (same as McLaren P1) into the combustion chambers, generating 960 horsepower and 811 pound-foot of torque. And that’s the regular Agera only. Like its predecessor, the R version has modified fuel injection system to allow drinking E85 or E100 biofuel. This pushes output to an astonishing 1140 hp and 885 lbft, very close to Bugatti SS, yet the Koenigsegg is 510 kg lighter! The engine is also remarkably lightweight at 197 kg, thanks to carbon-fiber intake manifolds and Inconel exhaust.

The Cima 7-speed gearbox is another new item. It is basically an automated manual, but it incorporates an additional wet clutch-brake to slow down the input shaft during upshifts. This speeds up rev-matching hence gearshifts. Trickily, Koenigsegg calls it a dual-clutch transmission. The Agera also gets a new active differential, which unusually combines a conventional mechanical LSD with a supplementary active hydraulic clutch.

Outside, the carbon body keeps the same shape but its nose and tail styling has been improved a little. It generates more down force – some 300 kg at 155 mph, thanks to the winglets mounted at the front radiator outlets as well as the new adjustable rear wing. On the down side, drag coefficient is worsened a bit to 0.33. This rises further to 0.37 when the rear wing is set at high angle. Despite that, Koenigsegg continues to be wild on estimation of top speed. It said the Agera R is theoretically good for 273 mph (440 km/h), but this is possible only when the factory unlocks its speed limiter, which is set at 233 mph (375 km/h). Well, I suppose 233 mph is already more than any race tracks can handle. This must be the least useful speed limiter ever made!



With a power-to-weight ratio trumping Le Mans cars, the Agera R feels very fast for sure. At low rpm it might not be as punchy as Bugatti or McLaren P1, as its large turbos take time to spool up, but once it passes 4000 rpm the acceleration becomes really explosive, and the surge is relentless until over 7000 rpm. Despite that, the rear axle contains the power effectively, at least on the flat proving ground where motoring journalists are allowed to exploit its performance. The car also turns flatly and stops rapidly like a Le Mans race car. Our only concern is whether it can carry over the excellent handling to fast country roads, because its chassis tuning was done mainly on the proving ground. Pagani Huayra is known for highly exploitable on mountain roads. McLaren P1 and Porsche 918 are likely to be the same. The Koenigsegg seems to be less tolerable and probably edgier to push.

At cruising pace, however, the car displays a friendly manner. On the undulating roads outside Koenigsegg’s factory, it rode with surprising suppleness, thanks in no doubt to the low unsprung weight. The Cima gearbox doesn’t upshift as smoothly as a real DCT, of course, but it is quicker and slightly slicker than the AMTs of Huayra and Aventador. The cockpit is roomy enough, and it is luxuriously trimmed to the extent of flamboyant.

Whether it is worth US$1.5 million plus tax depends very much on your taste. These days there are too many supercars to choose from, and all are faster than you can imagine. The Koenigsegg is neither the most technological advanced nor the most artistic, but it does feel special. People buy it not only for its eye-popping performance figures but also its countless of bespoke components and unique designs, not least of which are the double-axis swivel doors.
Verdict:

 Published on 18 Mar 2015 All rights reserved. 
One:1


With the introduction of Porsche 918, McLaren P1 and Ferrari LaFerrari, 2014 was remembered as the year of hybrid supercars. Swedish supercar maker Koenigsegg would join the hybrid battle a year later, but before that, it has to push the boundary of conventional-powered supercars to an unprecedented height, and that was realized by its One:1.

The One:1 is again an evolution from the breed of CC8 / CCR / CCX / Agera, just made to be more advanced and extreme in every aspect. Only 6 cars (plus a prototype) were built and each commanded more than 2 million US dollars before tax. Koenigsegg calls it the world’s first “megacar”, as it possesses 1 megawatt of power or 1360 DIN horsepower. That trumps the current record holder Bugatti Veyron SS by 160 hp and exceeds the last Agera R by 220 hp. More brilliant is that it manages to cut 75 kg from the Agera at the same time, resulting in a DIN kerb weight of 1360 kg. Yes, 1360 hp and 1360 kg, things could not have been more coincidental! Thanks to this magic power-to-weight ratio, the car is named One:1.

As usual, a few motoring journalists were invited to test the new Koenigsegg at its proving ground, i.e. an ex-Swedish airforce runway, while one was allowed to have a brief cruising at Goodwood festival of speed. Frankly, apart from some emotional expressions about its immense power, speed and wheel spin, their reviews offered little insight. After all, the car is simply too powerful to be assessed on unideal places like those. Unfortunately, Koenigsegg would not allow outsiders to test the car at race tracks or on decent roads. It expressed confidence to beat the Nurburgring lap record of Porsche 918 – and said will do that later – but it just wouldn’t allow third-party to do so. As long as Koenigsegg keeps treating motoring journalists that way, I’m afraid we cannot treat its cars and its more generous rivals on equal ground.



Anyway, to view the One:1 from technical perspective, it is undoubtedly very interesting. It might even teach the big boys a few lessons. We start from the aerodynamics. While it is obviously evolved from the Agera, you will notice the extra winglets added fore of the front wheels and the now aero-optimized door mirrors. More eye-catching is the huge rear wing, which looks really like a whale tail. It is double-plane and its angle is adjustable hydraulically, but most special is the mounting means - it is mounted at the top surface by a pair of carbon-fiber brackets extending a long way from the fastback. What is the benefit of such an unusual arrangement? As the underside of the wing is smooth and free of brackets, it allows a lot of air to flow underneath the wing with little turbulence. This enhances the aerodynamic efficiency, increasing downforce and adding little drag. The car also incorporates active aero flaps at front and rear underside. The result is 610 kg of downforce at 161 mph, almost double the amount of Agera!

Admittedly, the One:1 is shaped to favour downforce more than its predecessors (if you read the old reviews above, you will find there is a continuous shift of priority from drag to downforce throughout the years). The car has a slightly larger frontal area than the Agera, and its drag coefficient is now said to vary from 0.45 to 0.50 depending on the angles of aero devices. That sounds a lot for a modern road car. For instance, Bugatti Veyron has its Cd ranges between 0.39 and 0.42, while Porsche 918 is even down to 0.35. By calculation, the One:1 has its total drag (CdA) exceeding the Agera R by nearly 40 percent (!). Meanwhile, its engine power exceeds the latter by 19 percent. Theoretically it should attain a lower top speed. Somehow, Koenigsegg claims the same theoretical top speed of 273 mph… we can only say, no matter 273 or 250, you have nowhere to verify it.



The Agera’s 5-liter twin-turbo V8 already ran a fairly high state of tune. How does the One:1 find 220 extra horses? Koenigsegg altered a lot of components actually, including cylinder heads, camshafts, valves and fuel system, but more noticeable is a slight increase (0.3 mm) of bore, which brings the capacity closer to 5.1 liters. Most important, maximum turbo boost pressure is lifted from 1.4 to 1.8 bar, which is extremely high (Bugatti SS and McLaren P1 employ 1.5 and 1.4 bar respectively). Now you might think of bad turbo lag. Brilliantly, Koenigsegg avoids turbo lag by introducing a so-called “variable geometry twin-turbo”. It does not employ conventional VTG technology like Porsche 911 Turbo but an innovative variable-volume turbine housing made by 3D printing. It goes without saying the design is patented by Christian von Koenigsegg. (You can read more about it in AutoZine Technical School) In short, it utilizes a small turbine housing for faster spool up at low rev and a larger housing for optimized output at high rev. You would not have expected a firm as small as Koenigsegg to invent and build its own turbochargers!

Like Agera R, the maximum rating of 1360 hp is achieved with E85 biofuel. Its ECU can adapt to gasoline, but in that case power will drop to 1180 hp. As before, the power curve of Koenigsegg is unusually linear, more like a large naturally aspirated motor than a turbocharged one. Its peak output is delivered at 7500 rpm, 400 higher than Agera R. Maximum torque of 1011 lbft is not available until 6000 rpm.

The gearbox, a so-called “twin-clutch” 7-speed automated manual, is carried over from the Agera. It's not known for smoothness but its gearshift speed matches the performance of the car.



The chassis is basically the same as the Agera’s, as are the all-round double-wishbone suspensions with "Triplex" rear damper. However, the ride height, damping and spring rates are now electronically adjustable through hydraulic system, much like McLaren P1. Moreover, Koenigsegg has equipped the car with GPS and 3G communication so that, when the car recognizes a race track on which the factory had tested before, it will download the factory data automatically and adjust the suspension setup for each corner. No wonder Koenigsegg dares to call it “active suspension”. Likewise, the active aero, active differential and stability control can be adjusted automatically to suit the particular track. It's a great idea, although I suspect Koenigsegg has no time and resources to build up such database.

Apart from active aero and suspension, the new Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires are another advance over the Agera, as they offer more grip and better characteristics at the limit. Lastly but not least, the weight saving also plays a part in better handling. There is no particularly easy way to cut weight. Koenigsegg just trim weight bit by bit on many components, from carbon-fiber coating to each bolt. The pursuit of excellence is amazing.

With only 6 cars built and all delivered already, we are unlikely to see the One:1 stack up against LaFerrari, P1 or 918 Spyder in comparison test. I believe it could be extremely fast and stable on a track. Its variable suspension may deliver reasonable or even good ride comfort on normal roads. On the downside, its twin-turbo V8, despite of jaw-dropping numbers, is tuned to linear delivery thus unlikely to respond as quickly as those hybrid rivals. The gearshift should be more brutal. Real-world handling could be handicapped by its 2-meter-plus width and probably the lack of extensive testing on challenging roads. Even so, the One:1 has a lot to admire for its engineering and innovations – certainly more than the headline numbers.
Verdict:
 Published on 8 Dec 2017
All rights reserved. 
Agera RS


Initially described as a track-focused model, the Agera RS actually offers more usability than One:1.


Don’t expect this article can give you the driving impression of Agera RS, currently the fastest car in the world. Just like any Koenigseggs, it is extremely exclusive, and neither its maker nor its buyers are willing to let automotive journalists road test the car (other than a leisure ride perhaps). However, it doesn’t matter, because the Agera RS is very close to One:1, so it should drive similarly. In fact, since the earliest CC8S launched 15 years ago, each iteration of Koenigsegg is close to its predecessor. The line evolved continuously throughout the years in a fashion that makes Porsche 991 look almost revolutionary.

So what is Agera RS? You might remember Agera, the nameplate Koenigsegg started using since 2011. Even then, it was already good for 1140 horsepower and 273 mph in biofuel form. The Agera remained to be the “production” model of Koenigsegg, whereas One:1, created in 2014, was an even faster and more exclusive offering, with only 6 cars built for its very rich customers. The One:1 introduced some key improvements such as aerodynamics (especially the trailing rear wing) and a heavily modified V8 with new variable-volume turbos that produces 1360 hp on E85 fuel. Its suspension became hydraulically adjustable and the setup could be altered by GPS and 3G download. Moreover, it wore stickier Michelin Cup 2 tires. After the completion of One:1, Koenigsegg applied what it learnt back to the Agera, and the result is Agera RS.

When the Agera RS was introduced in Geneva motor show in 2015, it was described as a track-focused model. Ridiculously, this car actually offers more usability than the One:1, because it has a larger luggage compartment (like other Ageras) which makes it possible to store the removable roof panel. Besides, the deletion of roof-mounted air scoop enables the return of a rear window, however small it is, so it has better rearward visibility. Initially, the Agera RS was equipped with a smaller, tail-mounted rear wing. Power remained 1180 hp on gasoline. What it learnt from the One:1 were small details: aerodynamics (e.g. front splitter, winglets and active flaps under the car), lightweight sound insulation, the active self-leveling suspension, 3G-connected chassis setup and Cup 2 tires. However, later cars were finished with a trailing rear wing and the same 1MW engine as One:1. Again, 1360 horsepower is available only when drinking E85 fuel. As for kerbweight, the car is quoted 1395 kg, just 35 kilos more than the One:1. A total of 25 cars was planned to be built, and by this time all of them should be already delivered.


The Agera RS set 277.9 mph 2-way average on a public highway!


Living under the shadow of One:1, the Agera RS was rather understated until Koenigsegg used it for speed record attempts. In October 2017, it smashed Bugatti Chiron’s record of 0-400km/h (249mph) in 26.88 sec, and 0-400km/h-0 in 36.44 sec on an airfield in Denmark (Bugatti did that in 41.92 sec). A month later, the same car set a land speed record of 277.9 mph in 2-way average on a closed section of Nevada’s Highway 160, and by the way rewrote its own 0-400-0 record to 33.9 sec. Yes, on a public highway! We used to think the 240 mph record of McLaren F1 could hold forever. Then came the Bugatti Veyron with 253 mph and its Supersport version with 268 mph. Now the bar is lifted to 278. Perhaps 300 mph is not a dream anymore. Who will be there first? Hennessey Venom F5? Bugatti Chiron SS? Or yet another special Koenigsegg? Christian von Koenigsegg must be thinking seriously.
Verdict: 
Specifications





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout
Suspension features
Tires

Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
0-124 mph (sec)
0-186 mph (sec)
CC8S
2002
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel & Al subframes
Carbon-fiber
4195 / 2000 / 1070 mm
2660 mm
V8, 90-degree
4700 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Supercharger
-
655 hp / 6800 rpm
553 lbft / 5000 rpm
6-speed manual
All: double-wishbones
-
F: 255/40ZR18
R: 335/30ZR20
1175 kg dry / 1275 kg kerb
240 mph (c)
4.4*
8.4*
-
-
CCR
2005
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel & Al subframes
Carbon-fiber
4195 / 2000 / 1070 mm
2660 mm
V8, 90-degree
4700 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Twin-supercharger
-
806 hp / 7000 rpm
678 lbft / 5700 rpm
6-speed manual
All: double-wishbones
-
F: 255/35ZR19
R: 335/30ZR20
1180 kg dry / 1280 kg kerb
242 mph+ (c) / 241 mph**
3.1 (c)
-
-
-
CCX
2007
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel & Al subframes
Carbon-fiber
4293 / 1996 / 1120 mm
2660 mm
V8, 90-degree
4700 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Twin-supercharger
-
806 hp / 7000 rpm
678 lbft / 5500 rpm
6-speed manual
All: double-wishbones
-
F: 255/35ZR19
R: 335/30ZR20
1280 kg dry
245 mph+ (c)
3.1 (c) / 3.7***
-
9.3***
21.9***




Performance tested by: *Autocar, **Koenisegg, ***Sport Auto





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout
Suspension features

Tires
Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
0-124 mph (sec)
0-186 mph (sec)
0-200 mph (sec)
CCX Edition (CCXR Edition)
2008
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel & Al subframes
Carbon-fiber
4293 / 1996 / 1114 mm
2660 mm
V8, 90-degree (E85 fuel)
4800 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Twin-supercharger
-
888 hp/7000 rpm (1018 hp/7000 rpm)
693 lbft/5800 rpm (796 lbft/5600 rpm)
6-speed manual
All: double-wishbones
-

F: 255/35ZR19; R: 335/30ZR20
1280 kg dry
250 mph+ (254 mph+) (c)
2.9 (2.8) (c)
-
-
-
-
Agera (Agera R)
2011
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel subframes
Carbon-fiber
4293 / 1996 / 1120 mm
2662 mm
V8, 90-degree (E85 fuel)
5032 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Twin-turbo
-
960 hp/7100 rpm (1140hp/7100 rpm)
811 lbft/4000 rpm (885 lbft/4100 rpm)
7-speed automated manual
All: double-wishbones
-

F: 265/35ZR19; R: 345/30ZR20
1330 kg dry / 1435 kg kerb
(273 mph) (c)
2.9 (2.7) (c)
-
8.0 (7.8) (c)
(14.5*)
(17.7*)
One:1
2014
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel subframes
Carbon-fiber
4500 / 2060 / 1150 mm
2662 mm
V8, 90-degree, E85 fuel
5065 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Variable-volume twin-turbo
-
1360 hp / 7500 rpm
1011 lbft / 6000 rpm
7-speed automated manual
All: double-wishbones
Adaptive damping, variable spring, adjustable ride height
F: 265/35ZR19; R: 345/30ZR20
1360 kg kerb
273 mph (c)
2.7 (c)
-
5.8 (c)
13.1 (c) / 11.9*
14.3*




Performance tested by: *Koenigsegg





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout
Suspension features

Tires
Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
0-124 mph (sec)
0-186 mph (sec)
0-249 mph (sec)
Agera RS (1MW)
2017
Mid-engined, RWD
Carbon-fiber tub, steel subframes
Carbon-fiber
4493 / 2050 / 1120 mm
2662 mm
V8, 90-degree, E85 fuel
5065 cc
DOHC 32 valves
Variable-volume twin-turbo
-
1360 hp/7500 rpm
1011 lbft/6000 rpm
7-speed automated manual
All: double-wishbones
Adaptive damping, adjustable ride
height
F: 265/35ZR19; R: 345/30ZR20
1295 kg dry / 1395 kg kerb
277.9 mph*
2.7 (c)
-
-
12.3 (c) / 13.3*
24.0*
























































Performance tested by: *Koenigsegg





AutoZine Rating

One:1 / Agera RS



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