Toyota Allion / Premio

Debut: 2007
Maker: Toyota
Predecessor: Allion / Premio Mk1



 Premio

These are one of the most unappealing cars in Toyota’s lineup. They were designed for the domestic market only and target at people aged 40s or so, with conservative taste and limited driving desire. Many will be used as company cars. They are sized and priced between Corolla and Camry. Like Nissan found with its Bluebird Sylphy, the Japanese market demands mid-size cars that are smaller than their counterparts in America (now also Europe) because they are more friendly to road tax and parking. This is why Camry never found great success in its domestic market. For this reason, Toyota continues to offer Allion and Premio for its domestic market. Their bloodline could be traced back to the late Corona.

The two are basically the same car except the face and minor styling tweaks. Premio is supposed to be more luxury and traditional, while Allion appears to be younger – but just in relative terms. Neither cars can be considered as stylish. They look like a bridge between Corolla and Camry and continue the conservative design theme of tradition Toyota sedans. Both are built on a stretched Corolla platform, whose wheelbase is 2700 mm instead of 2600 mm. The additional wheelbase certainly frees up the front and rear legroom, but the same 1695 mm width means squeezing 3 adults into the rear seat will be difficult. The interior works exactly as a traditional sedan, without any new features to surprise you. The design and colors are also boring. However, we have no doubt in the solid build quality of Toyota.




 Allion

The twins are designed to be cost effective and economical to run. They offer a fuel-saving CVT and 3 choices of engines: 110hp 1.5-liter VVT-i (which falls in lower tax band), 136hp 1.8-liter dual-VVT-i and the new 158hp 2.0-liter dual-VVT-i with Valvematic. The latter is Toyota’s equivalent to BMW’s Valvetronic, which continuously varies the lift of intake valves to reduce pumping loss and improve breathing efficiency. To a 1270 kg machine, the 158hp engine is plenty powerful. What a pity CVT is never as responsive as a manual gearbox. Anyway, in Japan no one buys manual gearbox these days.

The Allion and Premio are designed to run smoothly and comfortably rather than delivering sporty handling. This mean their suspensions are tuned quite soft, while the electrical power steering has typical Toyota character – light and lifeless. The torsion-beam rear suspension, as carried over from Corolla, is not what a mid-size car could be proud of. However, when the application biases towards civilized use and the roads are as smooth as those in Japan, there seems to be nothing wrong to employ a cheaper suspension, save the cost and reward the customers with a lower price tag. The problem is, these two cars are content to be mediocre and has no intention to strive for excellence. With this attitude, they will never catch the heart of us.
The above report was last updated on 30 Dec 2008. All Rights Reserved.
 





Specifications




General remarks

Allion 1.8 VVT-i
Premio 2.0 VVT-i

Layout
Front-engined, FWD
Front-engined, FWD

Chassis
Steel monocoque
Steel monocoque
Body
Mainly steel
Mainly steel
Length / width / height 4565 / 1695 / 1475 mm 4600 / 1695 / 1475 mm
Wheelbase 2700 mm 2700 mm
Engine
Inline-4
Inline-4
Capacity
1797 cc
1986 cc
Valve gears
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT, VVL (Valvematic)

Induction
-
-
Other engine features
-
-

Max power
136 hp / 6000 rpm 158 hp / 6200 rpm
Max torque
129 lbft / 4400 rpm 145 lbft / 4400 rpm
Transmission
CVT
CVT
Suspension layout
F: strut
R: torsion-beam
F: strut
R: torsion-beam

Suspension features
-
-
Tyres front/rear
195/55VR16
195/55VR16
Kerb weight
1220 kg
1270 kg

Top speed
-
-

0-60 mph (sec)
-
-

0-100 mph (sec)
-
-

Performance tested by: -






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Toyota Allion / Premio
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