Ford Focus (Mk3)


Debut: 2011
Maker: Ford
Predecessor: Focus Mk2



 Published on 24 Jan 2011 All rights reserved. 


Being great fans of the first generation Ford Focus and having been disappointed by the second generation, we sincerely hope the Mk3 to succeed. We hope it will bring back the innovative style and great driving fun that marked out the original car. We also hope it will be a "world car" again, so that not only motorists in Europe and Asia but also those in America can enjoy driving it. Hopefully this could break the domination of Volkswagen Golf.

Ford seems to have answered most of our requests. The third generation Focus will be a global offering again. It will be produced in Germany, USA, China, Spain and Russia. Its underpinning platform will give birth to 10 variants in total, including 5-door hatchback, 4-door sedan (for China and US mainly), a station wagon, a coupe-cabriolet and sister cars like C-Max and Kuga etc. There won't be a 3-door hatchback anymore, but expect a Scirocco-style "New Capri" will fill that gap. These cars will push its annual production volume to 2 million units a year, even though Mazda has left the camp - by the way, this mean the new Focus no longer needs to share its dynamic know-how with Mazda 3.


Compare with the dull-looking Mk2, the Mk3 Focus looks far more aggressive – some may think it is probably too aggressive for a family car. Its profile is very sporty, with a steeply raked windscreen and rising waist line to promote a coupe shape. The arc-shape side windows also promote the misconception of coupe while leaving enough headroom for rear passengers. They just hamper the airiness of the cabin. The best to view the car is from the sides, where it appears to have some family resemblance with the original Focus. Not so great are both ends. Up front, you see a fairly characterless front grille and three oversized lower intakes that pretend to be a rally car. In fact, the two triangular ones are actually blocked, so they are purely cosmetic. The same can be said to half of the central intake. Men may prefer this killer style, but ladies are unlikely. The rear of hatchback breaks no ground from Lancia Delta or Opel Astra, but the taillights are obviously flamboyant. Overall, I would say Martin Smith (Ford's European design boss) is too heavy-handed this time. It's not as tasteful as Fiesta, although it does mark itself out by its aggressiveness.


Cabin is where the new Focus falls short of competition. Like Fiesta, its center console is designed with inspiration from mobile phones. Unfortunately, the reference it took is obviously Nokia rather than iPhone, which means the design is quirky and outdated. On the top Titanium X trim, the dashboard is made of high-grade plastics and nicely decorated with faux metal and piano black treatment. On cheaper Zetec model, they gave way to low-rent plastics which rob the car of quality feel. Golf and Astra will be safe from its challenge in this respect.

Cabin space is not its strongest suit either. Despite of a competitive wheelbase at 2648 mm, the Focus' cabin room is just average. Rear passengers will find less legroom than in the case of Astra and less headroom than in Golf. The smaller windows also make the ambience dark and confined. On the positive side, the driving position is excellent, thanks to fully adjustable steering wheel and a driver seat that finally adjust low enough. The latter answered our criticism on the Mk2.

The new Focus is about the same size as the last one. It also rides on similar (but further polished) suspensions consisting of MacPherson struts up front and control-blade multi-links at the rear. Predictably, the chassis employs high percentage of high-strength and ultra-high-strength steel, so its solidity and crash protection is significantly improved. The electro-hydraulic assistance in the steering is finally lost to a pure electric setup in the view of lower costs and energy consumption. New Dynamic Cornering Control adds brake-actuated "torque vectoring", just like many rivals already did.


Engines are just as we have seen in sister car C-Max. It starts from a 1.6-liter Ti-VCT (twin-variable cam timing) with 125 hp, then a couple of turbo diesels (115hp 1.6TDCi and 163hp 2.0TDCi) and finally two versions of 1.6-liter Ecoboost direct-injection gasoline turbo engine, producing 150hp or 180hp. Considering the new Focus gets heavier again (by 75-100 kg depending on engines), it needs the turbocharged engines badly. Ford's 2.0 turbo diesel is a willing and refined performer, but the 1.6 turbo petrol is even better for its sweeter revving manner and lighter load on the front axle, which puts less stress on handling.

This bring us to the most important part of assessment – ride and handling. Can it repeat the success of Mk1 ? Regretfully, it cannot.

The new Focus continues to shift towards mass-market tastes – higher refinement, more directional stability and safer handling. It sounds very much like Golf. The first impression of the drive is a remarkably quiet environment. Its sound insulation matches the best of the class, ditto the filtering of vibration and harshness from the suspensions. The electrical power steering is free from kickback (what else would you expect on such systems ?). The powertrain (in case of Ecoboost or TDCi) is refined yet flexible. The gearshift of the 6-speed manual gearbox is slick, too. The new car is so much more relaxing to drive than the outgoing car. Not even Golf can fend off its challenge.


Moreover, the absorbent ride does not come in the expense of body control. It still attacks corners with the same vigor of the old car. Its front tires still bite hard on the tarmac, and the torque-vectoring program brakes the inside wheel to aid tight maneuver very effectively. So why do we say it cannot match the Mk1 for driving fun ? The answer lies on the steering and chassis balance. Although this electrical power steering is one of the best on the market, being quick, precise and progressively loading up in corners, it still lacks the ultimate communication that keen drivers adore, sadly. If you have never driven the original Focus, or to less extent the second generation, that will be fine for you. Otherwise, you will be disappointed to see the successive degradation of steering feel.

As we have pointed out, the new chassis is tuned to favour directional stability. This mean you will encounter understeer more easily than before. It also loses the previous keenness to oversteer at lift-off throttle, giving the driver an impression of a safer but less adjustable handling. Yes, the Mk3 might corner faster and more stable than the old cars, but that is mainly down to its improved front end grip rather than a dynamic chassis balance.

Having said that, the Mk3 Focus still edges out Golf for handling. Whether it can beat Alfa Romeo Giulietta on dynamics remains to be seen, but for sure, it is no longer in a class of its own. Taking into account the below-par cabin and controversial styling, it is hard to recommend over these rivals.
Verdict: 
 Published on 26 Feb 2011 All rights reserved. 
American Focus sedan

Two things are crucial to American motorists - a trunk and a large capacity engine. The American version Ford Focus is no exception. Unlike the first generation Focus, it is designed as both hatchback and sedan from the outset, no wonder the styling of the sedan is far better resolved. American buyers will no longer feel being treated as second-class citizens.

Concerning large-capacity engine, the American version skips Europe's small turbocharged motors for a 2-liter naturally aspirated unit. It is a development from Mazda's MZR family and packed with technologies like Ti-VCT (twin-variable cam timing) and direct gasoline injection. The latter enables a 12.0:1 compression hence a respectable output of 160 horsepower and 146 pound-foot of torque. Performance is brisk, if not as strong as the 1.6 Ecoboost engine on European Focus.


While manual gearbox is standard, most American buyers are likely to opt for the Powershift 6-speed twin-clutch gearbox. It is a good substitution for torque-converter automatic, but its long gearing and tendency to select higher gear at auto mode means little fun. Obviously, the box is tuned to favour fuel economy. In manual mode, driver satisfaction is spoiled by the lack of shift paddles – it uses a rocker switch on the conventional gear selector to make gearchanges. It is better to stick with the manual gearbox.

As expected, the 4-door Focus delivers a ride and handling with strong European flavours because it shares the same suspension setting with the European version. Its ride is firm but composed. The chassis feels solid and noise level is remarkably low compare with its rivals ranging from Honda Civic to Hyundai Elantra. For keen drivers in America, it should be the first choice of the class. We wouldn't say so in Europe, where Volkswagen Golf and Alfa Romeo Giulietta are present, but across the Atlantic it is simply unbeatable.
Verdict:
 Published on 29 Feb 2012 All rights reserved. 
Focus 1.0 Ecoboost

For decades, 3-cylinder motors have limited presence in automotive world except on Japanese K-cars. However, the landscape is going to be very different in the next couple of years. Most mainstream manufacturers are having 3-cylinder engines on the pipeline – Volkswagen group has introduced a 1.0-liter unit on its Up / Citigo / Mii; Renault-Nissan has a 1.2-liter unit on March; Ford is launching a 1.0-liter Ecoboost engine on Focus; BMW is working on a 1.5-liter unit for its 1 and 3-series; Opel/Vauxhall is going to build an all-new 3-pot engine; Ditto PSA Peugeot-Citroen and Mercedes-Benz. The only exception is Fiat group, as it bets on the even smaller TwinAir engine. Small motors have never received such attention. The driving force behind the scene is new EU legislation. Let me take some time to explain here.

EU regulation no. 443/2009 has been effective since the beginning of this year. It calls for an average CO2 emission limit of 130 grams per kilometer for mainstream car makers selling cars in the European Union. Failing to meet that target will have to pay a premium for each gram of excess emission, i.e. €5 for the first gram, €15 for the second gram and €95 per gram thereafter. No wonder car makers work so hard on downsized engines. The exact emission limit is actually weight dependent, given by the formula 130g + 0.0457 x (EU weight – 1372 kg). Take the existing Ford Focus 1.6 Ti-VCT for example, its limit is calculated to be 129 g/km. As its actual emission is rated at 136 g/km, theoretically Ford has to pay a fine of €495 for each Focus 1.6 Ti-VCT sold (assuming Ford cannot produce enough lower emission models to offset the fine). This is why Ford developed the new 3-cylinder engine to replace the 1.6 Ti-VCT engine. The change will start with Focus.

The UK-engineered 1.0 Ecoboost is the most sophisticated 3-cylinder engine ever reached mass production. It is engineered to be especially compact and lightweight – some 30 kg less than the 1.6 Ti-VCT despite of cast-iron block, partly because it abandons balancer shaft for counterweights in the flywheel as means to cut the typical first order vibration on 3-cylinder engines. To produce power comparable to the already efficient 1.6 Ti-VCT, it packs direct injection, dual-continuous VVT and a quick-spooling small turbocharger. Initially there are two states of tune – 100hp and 125hp, both are accompanied with 125 lbft of torque from as little as 1400 rpm. The higher power unit is also available with a 30-second burst of up to 147 lbft on overboost. The flat torque curve makes the engine more flexible than the old 1.6 engine, thus delivers better real-world performance, although slightly slower figures are quoted. Moreover, the engine is impressively refined - no perceivable turbo lag and vibration, just like a good naturally aspirated four-cylinder engine. It is quiet, too. Its maturity makes the Fiat TwinAir engine sounds crude.

Assisted with automatic stop-start and direct injection, the small motor delivers an emission rating of 109 g/km for 100hp version or 114 g/km for 125hp version, excellent for a gasoline-drinking C-segment car. If you have no idea what these figures mean, read this: an A-segment Volkswagen Up 1.0 emits 108 g/km.

In fact, the 1.0 Ecoboost is our pick of the Focus range. It combines useable performance, good refinement and outstanding economy in one package. The 30 kg weight saving on front axle also makes it a bit more eager to steer. No other small engines could be as versatile.
Verdict:
 Published on 17 Jun 2012 All rights reserved. 
Focus ST

Fast Fords used to employ RS badge from the 1970s to 1990s. In recent years, the RS badge is reserved for the hottest limited edition models like the first two generations Focus RS, whereas production fast Fords turned to use ST badge. Ford produced two generations of Focus ST. The first one (ST170) caught our hearts but was short-lived. The second car did not gel with us but it was actually very popular, thanks to the combination of good performance, everyday usability and accessible price. As a result, the new Mk3 follows the successful formula set out by the Mk2. It has no intention to rival Renault Megane RS 265, Opel Astra OPC, Volkswagen Golf R or Scirocco R to be the best hot hatch on the market. Instead, it wants to be the best bargain and therefore the best selling. With a starting price of £22,000, it is £3K cheaper than a similarly equipped Megane RS, £5K less than the new Astra OPC (VXR), £7K less than Scirocco R and £8K less than Golf R. It also undercuts the slower Golf GTi by £3K.

Alright, there are some trade-offs you have to pay. Look at the car and you can see it isn't as elegant as its rivals. Its big mouth looks like that of a blue whale lying on the beach. Its bumpers, spoilers, fog lamp and signal lamp assemblies are all poorly styled. Moreover, you have to settle with the slightly bulky 5-door body because the current generation Focus does not offer 3-door version either. The end result is a car looking somewhat like an aftermarket modification.


Inside, arces of chunky plastic continue to dominate the cabin like the regular car. It looks outdated and cheap, although the quality of materials is actually no bad. Differing from the regular car are the Recaro sport buckets and additional gauges mounted atop the dash. They show oil pressure, water temperature and turbo boost pressure. As before, I don't think they are really necessary on this car considering the performance it offers.

Powering the ST is no longer the Volvo-sourced 2.5-liter five-pot. To meet modern expectation for low emission, it switched to a 2.0-liter Ecoboost four-pot engine. It is a development from the one serving Mondeo. With modern technologies like twin-continuous VVT, direct injection and a close-coupled low-inertia turbocharger, it is even more advanced than the aforementioned rivals (all don't get twin-VVT, while Renaultsport also lacks DI), let alone the old Volvo engine. Higher tuning enables it to produce a remarkable 250 horsepower and 265 pound-foot of torque, eclipsing the old 5-pot by a good 25 hp and 29 lbft. Moreover, it drinks 20 percent less fuel, even though the Mk3 body is slightly heavier. The car now tops 154 mph and sprints from 0-60 mph in 6.2 seconds. It is not as quick as its rivals, but close enough to embarrass them.

To make possible this lower price, Ford keeps the ST as simple as possible. The gearbox is strictly a 6-speed manual. The suspension basic remains the same as the regular Focus, leaving the sophisticated RevoKnuckle struts to the next RS, if it will ever be built. Stiffer springs and dampers, thicker and remounted anti-roll bars and a 10 mm drop of ride height are all it needs. The steering is still assisted by electric motor like the regular Focus, although it uses a new, variable ratio rack which needs only 1.8 turns from lock to lock. To deal with torque steer, Ford introduces a cheap solution – Torque Steer Compensation system – which is actually the electrical power steering specially programmed to counteract the torque steer forces if it detects the front wheels deflecting independently of steering input. Similarly, brake-actuated electronic torque vectoring is employed in place of costly limited slip differential. Overall, modifications to the hardware are limited.


On the road, the ST is quite fast and fun to drive. The engine might not be as responsive and linear as the small-turbo unit on Golf GTi, but it is tractable low down and particularly strong at mid-range. The power band sustains from 2000 rpm to 5500 rpm, thereafter it tails off and leaves the car trailing its more powerful rivals. The four-cylinder engine is surprisingly good to listen. At low rpm it is remarkably quiet, giving it good refinement at motorway cruising. Above 3500 rpm, a flap in the exhaust system opens and amplifies the exhaust noise. Meanwhile, a sound symposer channels the induction noise from the engine compartment to the cabin. Together they compose a delicious symphony. The 6-speed manual is slick to shift, too.

Next thing you will notice is the super-quick steering. The more you turn the quicker it becomes. This makes it especially handy to guide the car through hairpins and tight corners, while leaving straight line stability untouched. The steering also loads up significantly in corners and at speed, although the transition is too aggressive and self-centering is a touch too strong. You will never get a truly feelsome EPS with current technology, but as far as it goes its communication is pretty faithful, if not as good as the electrohydraulic rack on the old car. Torque steer, however, is still a problem. TSC or not, you can still feel the steering wheel tugging slightly in your hands, especially on uneven surfaces when 1st or 2nd gear is engaged. It's not unmanageable, but its presence does hurt the sense of refinement.

The suspension setting is softer than that of Megane RS. It sacrifices some chassis response and body control for a supple ride that suits day-to-day driving on a variety of roads. However, the ST is also well balanced. It does not feel nose-heavy like the old car. It turns in willingly, and then you can induce oversteer by lifting off throttle at mid-corner. Such an adjustable handling makes it fun to drive.

As I mentioned from the beginning, the Focus ST is not supposed to rival the hottest hot hatches on the market, so Megane RS 265 is safe with its crown. What the fast Ford might threaten is Golf GTi. While it lacks the latter's tasteful style, premium build quality, engine and steering refinement, it offers superior performance and a more entertaining chassis, not to mention a considerably lower price. My heart is still at the Golf course, but many sensible drivers may put their money on the Ford.
Verdict:
 Published on 21 Mar 2016
All rights reserved. 
Focus RS


Since its inception 40 years ago, the hot hatch market has never been so exciting. Today, we have the monstrous-fast Mercedes A45, the sublime Volkswagen Golf R, the highly entertaining Renault Megane RS275 Trophy and the flying Honda Civic Type R, so good that not even Audi RS3 can make an impression among them. However, when it comes to the best hot hatches in the world, how come we miss fast Fords? Especially the new, third generation Focus RS?

Many see the new Focus RS as a potential class leader because it has all the ingredients to succeed – a chassis polished by the well-respected RS team, a new 350-horsepower engine and an advanced 4-wheel-drive system. The latter is especially tempting if you remember the last two Focus RS were FWD and therefore troubled by torque steer. It sounds like a reborn Escort RS Cosworth, but I would say it is more than that. Its 4WD system is not the usual Haldex multi-plate clutch arrangement that most European manufacturers use (including Golf R and RS3). Those systems cannot send power to the rear wheels until the front wheels start slipping thus their handling is reactive rather than active. Unlike them, the Ford’s 4WD hardware can actively send up to 70 percent torque to the rear axle regardless of the traction level of front wheels. Moreover, it can distribute torque between the rear wheels at will, or what we call “torque vectoring”. The result is more akin to the mighty Mitsubishi Lancer Evo X with its Active Yaw Control. The only difference is, the Ford has even more power, more grip and stronger capability of torque vectoring. It bridges the best of both worlds: European super-hot hatches and Japanese rally specials.

We’ll see more on that interesting 4WD hardware later, but first of all I would like to start our review from the weaknesses of the car…



Like the last two generations, the Mk3 RS had not been on the product plan until late in the lifespan of Focus. This means it is born with an outdated packaging. The exterior styling is okay if you like the boy-racer treatment, but the interior does look outdated and low in quality compared with newer rivals. Most telling is the kerb weight of 1524 kg, some 123 kg heavier than Volkswagen Golf R. Unlike the VW’s MQB platform, the older generation platform of Focus did not take weight reduction seriously. If Ford could delay the launch of RS by a year or two, it could have built the car on the next generation Focus and shed lots of kilograms. Poor planning always hurt the RS.

To overcome the mass, it employs a larger, 2.3-liter Ecoboost direct injection turbo four. Well, not quite as large as the 2.5-liter five-cylinder of its predecessor, but larger than the 2.0-liter norm of the class. It is developed from the one powering Ford Mustang, getting a larger compressor on the twin-scroll turbo, a larger intercooler, higher flowing intake and exhaust as well as a more heat-resisting cylinder head (casted by Cosworth), stronger gaskets and cylinder liners. Obviously, it is designed for more serious abuse. Output is lifted to 350 horsepower at 6000 rpm, while max. torque is 324 pound-foot from 2000 to 4500 rpm. The latter can be lifted further to 347 lbft on overboost for up to 18 seconds. In terms of power and torque, it is well above all rivals except A45 and RS3.

Power is channeled to all wheels through a standard 6-speed manual gearbox. It is a bit disappointing that the RS team has no budget to develop a twin-clutch gearbox to rival Volkswagen or Mercedes. However, it’s not a deadly sin, as the Focus RS is priced at a bargain £30,000. Moreover, keen drivers should love making gearshift by themselves, even though sacrificing a couple of tenths in 0-60 is inevitable. Ford claims it is able to do that in 4.5 seconds. It might take a lot of tires and some luck to replicate though. More impressive is the 165 mph top speed, which is made possible by the unusually large front splitter and rear spoiler. Like Honda Civic Type R, it is one of the few hot hatches that produce zero aerodynamic lift on both axles.



Now the 4WD system. It is developed and supplied by British company GKN, which calls it “Twinster”. GKN had already supplied a similar system to Range Rover Evoque, but the one on Focus RS is modified to offer rear-biased power distribution. It consists of 2 parts: Power Transfer Unit (PTU) and Rear-Drive Module (RDM). PTU is located at the front axle beside the transmission. It is made of only simple gearings thus the sole function is to transfer power to the propshaft. What does the magic is the rear-mounted RDM. It consists of 2 hydraulic multi-plate clutch packs, one for each rear wheel. Since the gearing is arranged such that the rear wheels turn 1.8 percent faster than the front wheels, it can make use of the speed difference to transfer power to the rear wheels. When both clutch packs engage to full, 70 percent torque goes to the rear wheels. Reduce the engagement and more torque shifts back to the front axle. If both are disengaged, the car reverts to FWD to save fuel. It’s that simple. Torque vectoring is achieved by engaging one clutch pack while loosening another. If one is fully engaged and another is open, all the available torque of the rear axle will go to one wheel, so it offers very strong torque vectoring effect. As you can see, the GKN Twinster has no center and rear LSD thus it is lighter than conventional full-time 4WD systems. On the Focus RS, it adds 60 kg including hydraulic system, about the same as a Haldex system.

The rest of the car is more predictable. Its suspension gets stiffer springs, bushings and anti-roll bars as well as the addition of Tenneco 2-stage switchable (but not adaptive) dampers. The chassis is reinforced around the rear shock towers, lifting torsional rigidity by 23 percent. The steering is quickened from 2.5 turns on the ST to just 2.0 turns, and its feel should be improved by shorter link arms and stiffer knuckles. The 19-inch alloy wheels are shod with 235/35YR19 Michelin PSS tires or, for track use, PS Cup 2 semi-slick. Last by not least, the brakes are enlarged to 350 mm front and 302 mm rear.


Now it's time for action. You still sit too high in the car, a problem shared with all Focus Mk3. Start the motor, squeeze some rev from it and you can hear an angrier sound, followed by crackles in the overrun. There is some turbo lag low down, but give it 2000 rpm and it picks up quickly, pulling harder than a Golf R can manage, and doesn’t give up until fuel cut-off at 6800 rpm. Its noise and power delivery might lack character, but it is certainly very strong and effective, especially in the mid-range. With so much torque, there is little need to touch the gearstick. But if you do, it will reward you with a short, weighty yet pretty slick gearshift.

In straight line, the Focus RS feels not as quick as Mercedes A45, which has even more power and less weight to haul. It does feel stronger than the Golf R, but without the responsive DSG it might be no quicker in real-world situation. What it does feel superior is the ability to attack corner. The quick and weighty steering places the nose accurately. The stiff suspension keeps body roll in check. The tires grip hard. Just when you expect the nose to run wide, torque vectoring at the rear wheels pulls it back into line immediately. Thanks to this surprisingly neutral attitude, it corners faster and more accurately than everything else in the class on mountain roads. However, what’s more interesting is, when you push beyond its very high limit, its tail steps out a bit, and now you are on 4-wheel drift like a rally car! This happens in Sport mode and especially easy in Track mode. The last mode is Drift, a toy best reserved for tracks or wide empty roads. It induces and holds power slide throughout the corner just as beautifully as a rear-drive BMW M2, but with additional security of AWD. The handling of Focus RS is simply incredible, like a mini Nissan GT-R!

Admittedly, the Focus RS is not as agile as the lighter Megane RS275 Trophy, and its steering isn’t as feelsome. Its stiffer suspension setting (even in the softer damper mode) and manual gearbox means it is not as good a daily companion as Golf R. Ditto the older interior and lack of premium build quality. Therefore, we’ll choose the Volkswagen for Monday to Friday, the Ford for a weekend blast in country and the Renault for track days. Choosing either of them won’t be wrong. However, if only one purchase is allowed, then keen drivers should take the Ford, because it is the King of twisties.
Verdict:
Specifications





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires
Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
Focus 1.6 Ti-VCT
2011
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4358 / 1823 / 1484 mm
2648 mm
Inline-4
1596 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
-
-
125 hp
117 lbft
5-speed manual
F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
-
205/55R16
1276 kg
122 mph (c)
10.2 (c)
-
Focus 1.0 Ecoboost
2012
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4358 / 1823 / 1484 mm
2648 mm
Inline-3
999 cc
DOHC 12 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
125 hp
125 lbft (147 lbft overboost)
6-speed manual
F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
-
205/55R16
1231 kg
121 mph (c)
10.3 (c) / 9.4*
29.9*
Focus 2.0TDCi
2011
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4358 / 1823 / 1484 mm
2648 mm
Inline-4, diesel
1997 cc
DOHC 16 valves
VTG turbo
CDI
163 hp
251 lbft
6-speed twin-clutch
F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
-
205/55R16
1461 kg
134 mph (c)
8.4 (c)
-




Performance tested by: *C&D





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission

Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires
Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)

0-100 mph (sec)

Focus 1.6 Ecoboost
2011
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4358 / 1823 / 1484 mm
2648 mm
Inline-4
1596 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
180 hp
199 lbft
6-speed manual

F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
-
205/55R16
1333 kg
138 mph (c)
7.5 (c)

-

Focus 2.0 sedan (US)
2011
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4535 / 1823 / 1465 mm
2648 mm
Inline-4
1999 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
-
DI
160 hp
146 lbft
6-speed twin-clutch or
5-speed manual
F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
-
215/50R17
1363 kg
122 mph (limited)
5M: 7.4*
DCT: 8.1* / 8.3**
5M: 21.5*
DCT: 22.6* / 22.7**
Focus ST
2012
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4362 / 1823 / 1484 mm
2648 mm
Inline-4
1999 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
250 hp / 5500 rpm
265 lbft / 2000-4500 rpm
6-speed manual

F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
-
235/40R18
1362 kg
154 mph (c)
6.2 (c) / 5.7* / 5.9*** / 6.3**** / 6.3*****
14.7* / 16.0*** / 15.0**** / 16.4*****




Performance tested by: *C&D, **MT, ***R&T, ****Autocar, *****Sport Auto





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque

Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires
Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
Focus RS
2016
Front-engined, 4WD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel
4390 / 1823 / 1472 mm
2647 mm
Inline-4
2261 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
350 hp / 6000 rpm
324 lbft / 2000-4500 rpm (overboost: 347 lbft)
6-speed manual
F: strut
R: control-blade multi-link
Switchable dampers
235/35YR19
1524 kg
165 mph (c)
4.5 (c) / 4.6* / 4.5* / 4.8**
12.2* / 12.5* / 13.8**




















































Performance tested by: *C&D, **MT




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